It’s Okay for Leaders to be Wrong

There are two alleged rules to follow when working under a boss.

“No. 1 the boss is always right.”

“No. 2 if the boss is wrong, resort back to the first rule.”

These are “supposed rules” that some follow because they either don’t want to create confrontation or their boss is unwilling to accept other’s skills and/or ideas.

These organizations don’t practice inclusion among team members.

The fact is, a manager isn’t always right.

Someone who thinks that they are always right, whether they justify it based on their position, title, salary, or role are wrong.

Always wanting to be right is dangerous.

What’s commonly known as, ‘Confirmation Bias’ or ‘Error Blindness’ can turn people against each other.

It can stifle conversations and ideas.

It’s frustrating and demeaning for everyone involved.

Smart people don’t stay in these situations for long.

Employees want to provide feedback, to feel like they are a part of something, to contribute.

If this is the case, organizations will have a more engaged and productive team.

Being okay with being wrong is one of a leaders most crucial skills.

When leaders accept this, a few things happen. They begin to ask more questions, they stop taking constructive criticism personally, and they see things from a broader perspective.

Being vulnerable isn’t easy. When leaders don’t have to pretend to know everything, they shift their focus towards unleashing the team’s potential.

Organization that include others, can be the difference between success and failure from those that exclude others.

Leadership is a collaborative effort.

Leaders, don’t ruin your credibility trying to have all the answers.