Leadership Authenticity

“What do these people want me to do? To be?”

That is a question that some in leadership positions ask themselves.

The issue with this is, if someone is acting or behaving in a way that isn’t authentic to themselves, people recognize it.

Ultimately, creating a lack of trust.

In this context, it’s good to think first about yourself. Think about who you are, what’s important to you, and consider your beliefs, values, and experiences. These are the things that account for who you are and is the person that other people want to see.

Just as some have a “work me” and a “home me,” so managers ‘act the role of a leader.’

For instance, some in leadership positions, who are not authentic leaders, are conscious of how people will react.

They try to behave in a way that appeals to the majority.

They distort what they think.

They persuade.

This causes disruption in nearly every industry.

Rather than pretending to be someone else, it’s much easier to be yourself.

Leaders who identify with themselves, display these observational characteristics: values and behavior, purpose and passion, self-discipline and consistency, heart and compassion, and relationships and connectedness.

The difference between the two is that one acts on their character and the other plays a character.

Sure, you can “try on” different approaches that worked well for others. Except, leading authentically is about finding what works best for you. To do so, it starts with knowing who you are, behaving in a way that’s concise with who you are, and being genuine.

When both groups of people look back on their lives, neither will be perfect, but one will be authentically theirs.