Leader; Teacher

Managers manage.

Except, when they begin to teach, do they become leaders too.

See, there’s a difference between managing others to success and leading others to find success, themselves.

Maybe this person is a teacher who not only educates their students on the subject of math but encourages and helps them explore career opportunities.

Maybe this person is a coach who not only guides the players on how to position their hand to catch the ball better but reminds them about the importance of good grades.

Maybe this person is a boss who not only administers work, but listens to and appreciates their staff.

Or, maybe this person is a parent who encourages their son and/or daughter to succeed.

While leaders have many titles (teacher, coach, boss, parent etc.), one commonality is that they teach.

They don’t only find satisfaction in their role, to teach, to coach, to administer, to parent etc., but they find satisfaction in mentoring others.

Rather than limiting teaching moments to meetings, planned events, or training, leaders teach organically. They work side by side sharing wisdom, offering advice and taking the time to help, which makes them stand out.

There is a strong drive to invest in other people not for their benefit, but for the reward it will bring others.

This helps build bonds that help their people grow and become leaders themselves.