Motivation in the Workplace

“Motivation in the Workplace”

On Amazon, there are more than 160,000 books relating to this topic with another 84 million hits on Google pertaining to this exact search phrase.

The resources are there.

Still, a number of employees find themselves unmotivated or dissatisfied with their work.

One could argue that each individual is responsible to their own motivation.

That we are all motivated by something different. Whether the position provides training in an area of interest. That the position is in a good location and allows flexible hours. Or, maybe the position meets the needs of benefits covered or monetary purposes.

Others might say that organizations should motivate their employees.

That it’s the organization who hires employees to follow the company’s direction. It’s the managers who assign the work, give recognition, unifies the team, and review performance.

“The way your employees feel is the way your customers will feel. And if your employees don’t feel valued, neither will your customers,” Sybil F. Stershic.

No matter the perspective, I think we can all agree that motivation in the workplace is important.

Motivation satisfies the needs of the individual.

Motivation promotes job satisfaction.

Motivation increases productivity.

Motivation stimulates interest and the curiosity to learn.

“Highly engaged employees make the customer experience. Disengaged employees break it,” Timothy R. Clark.

Without motivation, the opposite is true.

Nonetheless, having someone else believe in you can lead to great results.